Impressions from the “Day of Stones in the City” in Cottbus

Last Sunday, there was the “Day of Stones in the City” in various cities throughout Germany. Mr Wolfram Köbbel offered a walk through Cottbus to show the various stones used in the buildings and their history.

The original post in German is quite long, so I have not translated it completely yet. But perhaps some of my English-speaking readers might like to have at least a look at the pictures. If you're interested, just ask and I will extend the English text.

Permian Porphyrtuff (translation? “Porphyry tuff”?) at the House of the former Auguste Foundation:

Ehem. Auguste-Stift, Eingang eines Nebengebäudes

Ehem. Auguste-Stift, Eingang eines Nebengebäudes

Ehem. Auguste-Stift, Säule aus Rochlitzer Prophyrtuff

Ehem. Auguste-Stift, Säule aus Rochlitzer Prophyrtuff

Gneiss Giallo San Francisco (Italy, Preceambrian) with nice garnets:

Fassadenverkleidung Sparkasse Breitscheidplatz – Giallo San Francisco

Fassadenverkleidung Sparkasse Breitscheidplatz – Giallo San Francisco

Lower Cretaceous Sandstone:

Fassadenverkleidung Commerzbank, Schloßkirchstr. – Oberkirchener Sandstein

Fassadenverkleidung Commerzbank, Schloßkirchstr. – Oberkirchener Sandstein

Well on the market square from Upper Cretaceous Reinhardtsdorfer Sandstone (Saxony):

Brunnen auf dem Altmarkt: Reinhardtsdorfer Sandstein

Brunnen auf dem Altmarkt: Reinhardtsdorfer Sandstein

Blocks of bog iron ore from Peitz in the Klosterkirche (in addition to normal bricks):

Klosterkirche: Raseneisenstein (dunkle Blöcke)

Klosterkirche: Raseneisenstein (dunkle Blöcke)

Blocks of Theumaer Fruchtschiefer (“Theuma fruit slate”) at the Japanese Pavilion:

Blöcke aus Theumaer Fruchtschiefer am Japanischen Pavillon

Blöcke aus Theumaer Fruchtschiefer am Japanischen Pavillon

Close-up with Cordierite crystals (the “fruits”, although they look more like grain to me) from contact metamorphosis:

Theumaer Fruchtschiefer

Theumaer Fruchtschiefer

Passage at the Stadtpromenade with Rapakivi plates:

Durchgang zwischen Stadtpromenade und August-Bebel-Straße: Rapakivi

Durchgang zwischen Stadtpromenade und August-Bebel-Straße: Rapakivi

Close-ups with circular structure and green seams:

Rapakivi im Durchgang Stadtpromenade–August-Bebel-Str.

Rapakivi im Durchgang Stadtpromenade–August-Bebel-Str.

Rapakivi im Durchgang Stadtpromenade–August-Bebel-Str.

Rapakivi im Durchgang Stadtpromenade–August-Bebel-Str.

Devonian Lamprophyr (micro-gabbro?), with the fitting trade name Snow Flake:

Galeria Kaufhof: Lausitzer Lamprophyr

Galeria Kaufhof: Lausitzer Lamprophyr

We've been shown a nice mixture of various kinds of rocks during the two hour walk. They are stratigraphically also quite diverse:

Känozoikum Quartär Klosterkirche Raseneisenstein (Peitz)
Neogen
Paläogen
Mesozoikum Kreide Stadtbrunnen, Post Reinhardtsdorfer Sandstein (Sachsen)
Häuser am Altmarkt Cottaer Sandstein (Sachsen)
Commerzbank Oberkirchener Sandstein (Niedersachsen)
Jura
Trias Enke-Brunnen Breitscheidplatz Rüdersdorfer(?) Kalk
Paläozoikum Perm Auguste-Stift Rochlitzer Porphyrtuff (Sachsen)
Deutsche Bank Larvikit „Blue Pearl“ (Norwegen)
Karbon Bodenplatten Spremberger Str. Striegauer Granit (Strzegom, Polen)
Puschkinpark Theumaer Fruchtschiefer
Devon Stadthalle, Galeria Kaufhof Lausitzer Lamprophyr
Silur Schloßkirchpassage Vanga-Granit (Schweden)
Ordovizium
Kambrium Neues Rathaus (Säulen) Lausitzer Granit
Präkambrium Sparkasse Breitscheidplatz Gneis „Giallo San Francisco“ (Italien)
Geschäftshäuser Schloßkirchstr. Migmatit „Paradiso“
Stadtpromenade („Molle“) Korninsky-Granit (Gneis) (Ukraine)
Stadtpromenade (Durchgang Bebel-Str.) Rapakivi (Finnland)

The pictures above show only about half of the visited objects. There was a lot more to see, e.g. floor tiles etc. And our guide explained a lot, not only about geology but also about the history of buildings and the city.

Comments 4

  1. David B. Williams 1 ⟨ 26 Oct 2010, 04:04 PM | #  ⟩

    Thanks kindly for translating the key parts and sharing this. As someone interested in building stone, it is always great to see others posting about their local rocks and those who focus on them.
    David

  2. Lutz 2 ⟨ 26 Oct 2010, 04:35 PM | #  ⟩

    Schöne Zusammenfassung. Ich hab's dieses Jahr nicht geschafft. Letztes Jahr habe ich mir die Leipziger Natursteinwelt angesehen...

  3. fj 229 ⟨ 29 Oct 2010, 12:30 AM | #  ⟩

    David, thanks for stopping by. I didn't expect this humble blog to catch much attention from abroad. 😉

    My interest in building stones started just a few years ago when I joined a similar walk through Berlin (organised by Prof. Schroeder and Dr Schirrmeister from Technical University Berlin) with some students of “World Heritage Studies” from our University.

    I still need to read your book… At least it's already within reach; I just need the time.

  4. fj 229 ⟨ 29 Oct 2010, 12:32 AM | #  ⟩

    @Lutz: Ich muß zu meiner Schande gestehen, daß ich es hier in Cottbus dieses Jahr auch erst zum ersten Mal geschafft habe, obwohl es den Rundgang schon seit drei Jahren gibt (wenn ich mich nicht ganz irre).

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