Category Archives: Geologie

Risk of Stumbling

Schild „Geologische Aufschlüsse Stolpergefahr!“

Evelyn at Georneys is again hosting an Accretionary Wedge, this time about signs that are geologically or geographically interesting. My contribution is not even really mine, because I didn’t take the photo myself. I have come across the picture several years ago somewhere on the net, but forgot to remember where it was or by […]

Where on Google Earth #389

Where on Google Earth #389. Click to embiggen.

Some time ago already, I found Luis Filipe Miguel's WoGE 388, a nice alluvial fan at lake Alaköl in Kazakhstan. After that I was away for some days, and now everybody is hungry for a new challenge, so here it is. If you want to know what WoGE is, see below the fold. Previous WoGEs […]

Where on Google Earth #383

Where on Google Earth #383. Click to embiggen.

For the second time now, I found a WoGE by Ole Tjugen. Number 382 was – at first – a rather obvious piece of Swedish coast, but I didn’t realise the significance of this specific spot. Ole’s hint was too subtle for me, so he had to prod me into the right direction – the […]

The steam-powered permeameter

The La Pavoni Europiccola steam-powered permeameter.

Evelyn at Georneys is hosting this month’s Accretionary Wedge about seeing geology everywhere. As an example, she showed cute cats exposed to hideous tectonic arrangements. But where I live, tectonics are rather dull, limited to what happens when you remove several hundred to thousand metres of ice from the continent. Because I neither have a […]

Where on Google Earth #381

Where on Google Earth #381

For some time now, I started again with “Where on Google Earth“, with little success, however. (For a description what WoGE is, see below the fold. Previous WoGEs are collected by Felix on his blog and a KML file.) But now, together with my friend Frank (known in the WoGE Archean as “pl”), I found […]

Deep waters

NASA Perpetual Ocean

From time to time, xkcd has quite nice and scientific illustrations; recently, for example, a to-scale and non-logarithmic represenation of lake, ocean, and borehole depths:

Where on Google Earth #336

Where on Google Earth #336

I was able to find the last WoGE by Felix Bossert rather quickly. (I explained why in the comments there.) For a description what WoGE is, see below the fold. Previous WoGEs are collected by Felix on his blog and a KML file. Now I may come up with a new puzzle. Again I try […]

Where on Google Earth #332

Where on Google Earth #332

For quite some time, I always was too slow to solve the WoGE puzzles, if I even managed to give a try at all. (For a description what WoGE is, see below the fold. Previous WoGEs are collected on Felix Bossert's blog and in Ron Schott's KML.) Matthew's WoGE 331 was rather difficult, especially since […]

Igneous cats!

Igneous cats.

I've seen this ages ago and finally found it again: the igneous cats, from mafic to felsic:

All my WoGEs

These are all the WoGEs I posted, nicely collected, without any hints (sometimes I give some clues in the introduction) and direct links to the JPEG file, so there is no danger of accidentally reading the solution. 😉 (This may be an advantage over the category archive.) This page is also linked in the sidebar […]

Corundum fibre materials

A company, the name of which I withhold because of the ongoing innovative product development, is currently testing their new product “corundum rapid abrasion paper” (c.r.a.p.) at our university. This paper has several special properties: The fabric can be produced to be equivalent to sand paper grit sizes of >120, but is considerably thinner. Thus, […]

Geologist(s) and engineers in the German Parliament (Bundestag)

Christian Reinboth on Frischer Wind has collected data on the profession and educational background of the members of the German Parliament (Bundestag) and presents some statistical evaluation (sorry, German only). That's just an overview for now, and he's asking his readers what else could be extracted from the data base. There are some interesting results […]

Where on Google Earth #274

It seems I'm back on track with playing WoGE, although not always successful. (For a description what this is, see below the fold. Previous WoGEs are collected on Felix Bossert's blog and in Ron Schott's KML.) But this time I was lucky and found Felix Bossert's remake of WoGE 122, a close-up view of dunes […]

Rockslide at Hirschsprung in Obermaiselstein, Germany

Felssturz am Hirschsprung, Obermaiselstein, 2011.

On 14 January 2011 there was a rockslide at the “Hirschsprung” cleft near my home village of Obermaiselstein. I happened to visit Obermaiselstein a few weeks ago and had a look at it. These are some photos from 06.02.2011.

Where on Google Earth #270

For several months now I didn't get round to try solving WoGE puzzles (For a description what this is, see below the fold. Previous WoGEs are collected on Felix Bossert's blog and in Ron Schott's KML.) or was just too slow to find the current page on the web (and the location, of course). Now […]

Referendum on the disclosure of the contracts for the privatisation of the Berlin Water Supply

Today was the referendum for disclosing the contracts for the partial privatisation of the Berliner Wasserbetriebe (Berlin Water Supply, 49.9% of which belong to the companies Veolia and RWE), which was initiated by the organisation “Berliner Wassertisch”. It has been accepted according to the preliminary results (German page of the election supervisor). Living in Cottbus, […]

A stratigraphic chart for the Palm Pre

Some time ago, I've blogged about my stylesheets (CSS) with the colour codes of the International Stratigraphic Chart (ISC) of 2009. For some months now, I own a Palm Pre smartphone (which I am quite happy with) and thought that it would be quite handy) to have this chart on the phone. Of course, you […]

Stratigraphy stylesheet: now complete

In November 2008, I wrote my stratigraphy stylesheet, which contained colour codes for all units from the International Stratigraphic Chart (ISC) down to the period/system level. Later I added some Cenozoic and Mesozoic units of lower rank. When I was ill during the last weekend and therefore sometimes rather bored, I completed the colour codes. […]

Impressions from the “Day of Stones in the City” in Cottbus

Last Sunday, there was the “Day of Stones in the City” in various cities throughout Germany. Mr Wolfram Köbbel offered a walk through Cottbus to show the various stones used in the buildings and their history. The original post in German is quite long, so I have not translated it completely yet. But perhaps some […]

Thrust faults on the moon

It's nice that there is always something new to be learnt: the moon is covered with quite a lot of thrust faults, some of which could be “relatively young” (approx. 800 to 1000 million years). They are probably a result of a slight shrinking of the moon due to cooling. I've found this at Bad […]

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